ungoliantschilde:

Nick Cardy’s process for the Justice League of America #101.

(via sethandrewjacob)

comicsalliance:

THE FIRST THING I MADE WAS A WEAPON: THE MULTIVERSITY ANNOTATIONS, PART 2 
By David Uzumeri
Teased for years and finally launched in 2014, The Multiversity is a universe-jumping series of DC Comics one-shots tracking the cosmic monitor Nix Uotan and an assemblage of star-crossed heroes as they attempt to save 52 universes and beyond from a trippy cosmic existential threat that, like much of Morrison’s best work, represents something far more mundane and relatable. Tying back into the very first Multiverse story in DC’s history, the heroes of these universes become aware of this threat by reading about it in comic books… comic books that, it turns out, take place in neighboring universes. Indeed, writer Grant Morrison continues his streak of highly metatextual DC cosmic epics with this eight-issue mega-series (plus one Tolkienesque guidebook).

Described by Morrison as “the ultimate statement of what DC is”, The Multiversity naturally offers the reader much beyond the surface level adventure, and that means annotations. Rather than merely filling out checklists of references, my hope with this feature is to slowly unearth and extrapolate a narrative model for Morrison and his collaborators’ work on The Multiversity; an interconnecting web of themes and cause and effect that works both on literal and symbolic levels.

We’ll be focusing here on the second issue of the maxiseries, the unwieldily titled The Multiversity: The Society of Super-Heroes: Conquerors of the Counter-World, written by Grant Morrison with pencils by Tom Strong‘s Chris Sprouse, inks by Karl Story and Walden Wong, and gorgeous colors by Dave McCaig.

I’ll admit here from the beginning that while I can talk about this series’ relationship to the DC Universe and Morrison’s oeuvre, I’m close to clueless about the vagaries of early 20th century pulp fiction and would be incredibly interested in hearing from more learned readers whatever I’ve missed from that angle. That said, there’s still a great deal of meat to dig into in this issue, which serves as a sort of conceptual counterpoint to Final Crisis‘s opening scene, showing us the end of Anthro and Vandal Savage’s 40,000-year feud.
READ THE SOCIETY OF SUPER-HERO ANNOTATIONS

comicsalliance:

THE FIRST THING I MADE WAS A WEAPON: THE MULTIVERSITY ANNOTATIONS, PART 2 

By David Uzumeri

Teased for years and finally launched in 2014, The Multiversity is a universe-jumping series of DC Comics one-shots tracking the cosmic monitor Nix Uotan and an assemblage of star-crossed heroes as they attempt to save 52 universes and beyond from a trippy cosmic existential threat that, like much of Morrison’s best work, represents something far more mundane and relatable. Tying back into the very first Multiverse story in DC’s history, the heroes of these universes become aware of this threat by reading about it in comic books… comic books that, it turns out, take place in neighboring universes. Indeed, writer Grant Morrison continues his streak of highly metatextual DC cosmic epics with this eight-issue mega-series (plus one Tolkienesque guidebook).

Described by Morrison as “the ultimate statement of what DC is”, The Multiversity naturally offers the reader much beyond the surface level adventure, and that means annotations. Rather than merely filling out checklists of references, my hope with this feature is to slowly unearth and extrapolate a narrative model for Morrison and his collaborators’ work on The Multiversity; an interconnecting web of themes and cause and effect that works both on literal and symbolic levels.

We’ll be focusing here on the second issue of the maxiseries, the unwieldily titled The Multiversity: The Society of Super-Heroes: Conquerors of the Counter-World, written by Grant Morrison with pencils by Tom Strong‘s Chris Sprouse, inks by Karl Story and Walden Wong, and gorgeous colors by Dave McCaig.

I’ll admit here from the beginning that while I can talk about this series’ relationship to the DC Universe and Morrison’s oeuvre, I’m close to clueless about the vagaries of early 20th century pulp fiction and would be incredibly interested in hearing from more learned readers whatever I’ve missed from that angle. That said, there’s still a great deal of meat to dig into in this issue, which serves as a sort of conceptual counterpoint to Final Crisis‘s opening scene, showing us the end of Anthro and Vandal Savage’s 40,000-year feud.

READ THE SOCIETY OF SUPER-HERO ANNOTATIONS

tannhausergatorade:

Enrique Alcatena

Comics that don’t exist

(via ghostattack)

malachiward:

Panel for Prophet Strikefile #2 made with Matt Sheean and written by Simon Roy. 

malachiward:

Panel for Prophet Strikefile #2 made with Matt Sheean and written by Simon Roy. 

(via hustonthetodd)

zegas:


[RE-post cuz the first one was screwed up]

COPRA Round One is now available through Diamond Comic Distributors, order code OCT141106.

The book has received some great write ups so far! One by Chase Magnett for ComicBook.com and the other by Oliver Sava for the A.V. Club!

And, hey, I did an interview for Italian comics site Lo Sazio Bianco. Here’s the Italian version and the English version.

Image by Adam Pruett

zegas:

[RE-post cuz the first one was screwed up]
COPRA Round One is now available through Diamond Comic Distributors, order code OCT141106.
The book has received some great write ups so far! One by Chase Magnett for ComicBook.com and the other by Oliver Sava for the A.V. Club!
And, hey, I did an interview for Italian comics site Lo Sazio Bianco. Here’s the Italian version and the English version.
Image by Adam Pruett

skrull-queen:

Characters with Freaking Cool Superpowers [1/??] - Monica Rambeau: Control Over the Electromagnetic Spectrum

"You know what else is that fast? X-rays. Microwaves. Gamma radiation. Anything on the electromagnetic spectrum. Anything I can be.”

(via love-and-radiation)

entrecomics:

(Rafael López Espí)

entrecomics:

(Rafael López Espí)

(via joekeatinge)

browsethestacks:

Howard The Duck by Dave Sim

browsethestacks:

Howard The Duck by Dave Sim

(via matthew-online)

fantagraphics:

"Wilfred Santiago’s 21 is brilliant and beautiful, challenging and lyrical … which seems exactly right, as Roberto Clemente was all those things and more.” – Rob Neyer, ESPN.com

"A kaleidoscopic look at the life of the great Clemente. Santiago’s artwork is superb and the depth of his passion for the subject and incredible preparation comes through on every page." – Steven Goldman, author of Forging Genius: The Making of Casey Stengel and editor of Baseball Prospectus

"I’ll admit, being a baseball player often feels like a comic book experience: the costumes, the origins, the battles for great victories and inspiration it conjures in our fellow man. This book captures the essence of one of our sport’s greatest heroes, and it does so in a way that engages the imaginations as much as it reveals the heart, ink, color, style, and character; I can think of no better way to share a tale of a true legend." – Dirk Hayhurst, Toronto Blue Jays pitcher and author of The Bullpen Gospels

21: The Story of Roberto Clemente [Softcover Ed.]
by Wilfred Santiago

200-page duotone 6.25” x 8” softcover • $19.99
ISBN: 978-1-60699-775-8

Due to arrive in about 2-4 weeks. Click the thumbnails for larger versions; get more info, see more previews and pre-order your copy here:

http://www.fantagraphics.com/21sc

DESIGN AND/OR COMICS.


Curated by Dylan Todd.

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