comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1987: Teen Titans Spotlight #10

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1987: Teen Titans Spotlight #10

(via sethandrewjacob)

jasenlex:

ISOLATED COMIC BOOK PANEL #759title: PRAVDA - P59:1artist: GUY PEELAERTyear: 1968 

jasenlex:

ISOLATED COMIC BOOK PANEL #759
title: PRAVDA - P59:1
artist: GUY PEELAERT
year: 1968 

twiststreet:

A cover of a 1966 issue of Giff Wiff, a journal published by Le Club Des Bandes Dessinées, the “first organized association of French devotees to the comic strip as art form”, founded in 1962 by, among others, Alain Resnais (presumably after he had directed Last Year at Marienbad…?).  Chris Marker (La Jette) and Alain Robbe-Grillet were also members.  Giff Wiff published, among other things, Umberto Eco's essay “Le Mythe de Superman et la dissolution du temps’ [The Myth of Superman and the Dissolution of Time”.  

twiststreet:

A cover of a 1966 issue of Giff Wiff, a journal published by Le Club Des Bandes Dessinées, the “first organized association of French devotees to the comic strip as art form”, founded in 1962 by, among others, Alain Resnais (presumably after he had directed Last Year at Marienbad…?).  Chris Marker (La Jette) and Alain Robbe-Grillet were also members.  Giff Wiff published, among other things, Umberto Eco's essay “Le Mythe de Superman et la dissolution du temps’ [The Myth of Superman and the Dissolution of Time”.  

love-and-radiation:

All of Mike Wieringo’s keen covers from Sins of Youth, a now-ancient DC fifth-week event where Klarion the Witch-Boy uses magic to try and de-age all the super-heroes so they can be destroyed—only to be interrupted, with hilarious results.

All the adult super-heroes become teenagers, all the teenaged super-heroes become adults, and all the senior super-heroes of the Justice Society end up as a preteens.

comicbookcovers:

The Losers #13, August 2004, cover by Jock

comicbookcovers:

The Losers #13, August 2004, cover by Jock

bigredrobot:

2299comic:

THE FUTURE IS NOW. 11 stories. 82 pages. $2.
Available now on Gumroad.

It’s here. Go get it. So many talented people in one place for a price that you literally cannot beat. I’m super proud of this whole thing.

Cross-posting because I’m insanely proud of this thing.

bigredrobot:

2299comic:

THE FUTURE IS NOW. 11 stories. 82 pages. $2.

Available now on Gumroad.

It’s here. Go get it. So many talented people in one place for a price that you literally cannot beat. I’m super proud of this whole thing.

Cross-posting because I’m insanely proud of this thing.

jthenr-comics-vault:

Splash Page FromAMAZING SPIDER-MAN ANNUAL #14 (October 1980)Art by Frank Miller (pencils), Tom Palmer (inks) & Ben Sean (colors)Words by Denny O’Neil

jthenr-comics-vault:

Splash Page From
AMAZING SPIDER-MAN ANNUAL #14 (October 1980)

Art by Frank Miller (pencils), Tom Palmer (inks) & Ben Sean (colors)
Words by Denny O’Neil

(via joekeatinge)

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script
"Notes as follows:
1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.
2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.
3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.
4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.
5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.
6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.
7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.
8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:
CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.
CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.
CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.
CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.
CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.
9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:
NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.
CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”
CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.
10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.
11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.
12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.
13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”
- Nate Piekos
http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

letteringlibrary:

How To Format A Comic Book Script

"Notes as follows:

1) A page header with the book title, number and writer’s name.

2) Each new script page should begin on a new document page. And you can’t miss the page number when it’s big and bold. Often, I have to skim through a script to look for a note or direction. Big page numbers help tremendously.

3) Panel numbers almost as bold and clear as the page number.

4) Panel descriptions for the most part don’t have to be that lengthy unless it’s really necessary. The actions of characters should be here, (not in the lettering area; see #6) set direction, and notes to the other members of the creative team if necessary.

5) Also, the digital age has given us the greatest source of reference that comic creators have ever had access to. Links to reference photos should also be included in the panel description.

6) Under each panel description is the lettering area. Everything that needs to be lettered goes here.

7) Each item in the lettering area should be numbered. If the editor is doing lettering placements, these numbers correspond to the placements sent to the letterer.

8) The call-out of each lettering item and any descriptors like these:

CHARACTER (OFF), meaning the character is speaking from off-panel.

CHARACTER (WHISPER), self-explanatory.

CHARACTER (BURST), meaning the dialogue is shouted and should be in a burst balloon.

CHARACTER (WEAK), character’s dialogue should be diminished.

CHARACTER (SINGING), self-explanatory. Usually accompanied by music notes.

9) Like dialogue, captions have their own descriptors:

NARRATION or CAPTION (CHARACTER), self-explanatory. The inner thoughts of a character.

CAPTION (TIME/PLACE), such as, “New York, 2013.”

CAPTION (VOICE OVER), meaning the character is speaking, but is not in the location shown in the current panel.

10) SFX, self-explanatory, “sound effect”.

11) Dialogue should be indented, NOT tabbed over. If you use tabs, the letterer has to run find/replace searches on the document to delete them all before lettering. (To use indents in MS Word, go: Format / Paragraph / Indents & Spacing.) Dialogue should also be written in plain sentence case, not CAPS.

12) Dialogue that should be bold in the comic, should be bold and/or underlined in the script. If you use caps for bold dialogue, the letterer will have to convert it to sentence case before lettering.

13) Non-English dialogue should be italic. Whole blocks of dialogue that are translated into English, should begin with a , and are usually accompanied by a caption explaining what language is being spoken.”

- Nate Piekos

http://www.comicbookscriptarchive.com/archive/panel-1/how-to-format-a-comic-script/

Very cool.

Comics has an outrage problem.

4thletter! » Blog Archive » Beyond Outrage

I spent some time in LA over 4th of July weekend getting my west coast on. I came back to the world on Monday after a great weekend, only to find that the comics internet had melted down over an ill-conceived hashtag and was busy stomping up and down on the heads of people who were no threat to them.

This isn’t about that, or the hashtag. It’s about all the other times comics has faced controversy and replied with scorn.

The short version is “you don’t have to like it, but please respect it.” The long version is through the link. Comments are off until I get back from lunch, but hopefully you get something out of this.

(via iamdavidbrothers)

If you read only one thing today, click through and read this. It is so important.

(via postcardsfromspace)

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1985: Marvel Age #28 cover + interview

(via joekeatinge)

DESIGN AND/OR COMICS.


Curated by Dylan Todd.

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