comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1985: Marvel Age #28 cover + interview

(via joekeatinge)

browsethestacks:

Not Brand Echh (1967-1968)

(via themarvelageofcomics)

browsethestacks:

Not Brand Echh (1968-1969)

(via themarvelageofcomics)

zegas:

Wonder Woman by Nick Cardy
mythosidhe:

Wonder Woman by Nick Cardy

zegas:

Wonder Woman by Nick Cardy

mythosidhe:

Wonder Woman by Nick Cardy

fortressofattitude:

Beautiful King Kirby pin-up of the Challengers of the Unkown

fortressofattitude:

Beautiful King Kirby pin-up of the Challengers of the Unkown

(via sethandrewjacob)

As a former DC editor, I’m well aware of the equity process. In the course of my job at the company, I was involved with sending the equity paperwork to creators, letting them know the guidelines, and occasionally submitting related paperwork to the proper department within DC to ensure the creators were taken care of. There were some characters from comics I worked on where creators requested equity and were turned down based on the above criteria, and Brennert is one of many such creators. There are lots of creators who have been granted equity when their characters do meet those qualifications.

Based on my experience, my reading of the situation is this: Brennert’s creation of Barbara Kean Gordon is not only “close” to her sometimes-daughter in the DCU, Barbara Gordon; it fits all of DC’s stated criteria for being officially derivative. She looks the same, has the same name – she’s even at a library after hours, implying that she, like Barbara Not-Kean Gordon, is a librarian.

Janelle Asselin looks at whether or not Alan Brennert deserves creator equity for usage of Jim Gordon’s wife in the new Gotham TV show. (via graemem)

2000adonline:

History Of Justice - Brian Bolland & Mick McMahon

Superb early pictorial history of Judge Dredd, from the Cursed Earth to Judge Death, by two of the lawman’s finest proponents…

  • Top: Mutant gang, known as the Mutie Brotherhood that Judge Dredd encounters in the city of Keystone, on his epic cross-country mercy mission across the Cursed Earth (Prog65,20May’78). Art: Brian Bolland
  • Dredd has his first encounter with legendary black tyrannosaur, Satanus, when he’s offered up as sacrifice to the beast, by residents of the Cursed Earth township of Repentance (Prog74,22May’78) - Brian Bolland(a)
  • A reward is issued for Dredd, after he is framed for murder by the insane soon-to-be Chief-Judge Cal, in Bring Me The Head Of Judge Dredd (Prog88,28Oct’78) - Brian Bolland(a)
  • The Day The Law Died: With Cal sworn in as C-J, the despotic madman begins to implement his evermore bizarre laws and actions, including appointing his pet fish as Deputy Chief! (Prog90,11Nov’78) - Brian Bolland(a)
  • The Day The Law Died: Dredd leads a revolt against Cal's corrupt regime, with a ragtag army of misfits and retired Judges from the Academy of Law (Prog98,3Feb’79) - Mick McMahon(a)
  • Dredd is challenged by giant Undercity dweller, Fergee, before recruiting him in his fight against Chief-Judge Cal (Prog101,24Feb’79) - Mick McMahon(a)
  • Judge Dredd has to reassert the rule of Justice Dept., in a particularly lawless sector of Mega-City, controlled by Gestapo Bob Harris & the Cosmic Punks, in Punks Rule (Prog110,28Apr’79) - Brian Bolland(a)
  • Dredd investigates reports of inhabitants of a city block devolving into an animalistic state, in Monkey Business At The Charles Darwin Block (Progs184-85,1-8Nov’80) - Mick McMahon(a)
  • Alien superfiend, Judge Death escapes his prison inside Psi-Judge Anderson's mind, with the help of his dark brethren, to wreak further chaos on Mega-City One, in Judge Death Lives! (Progs224-28,8Aug-5Sep’81) - Brian Bolland 
intrapanel:

Reader copy: minor tearing on sides from enthusiastic reading and the passage of time.
ORIGINS OF MARVEL COMICS1974, Fireside BooksJohn Romita Cover

intrapanel:

Reader copy: minor tearing on sides from enthusiastic reading and the passage of time.

ORIGINS OF MARVEL COMICS
1974, Fireside Books
John Romita Cover

comicartistevolution:

Bill Sienkiewicz 1985-1987: Selections from Who’s Who: The Definitive Directory of the DC Universe

Marvel’s 80s-era Handbooks really rocked my world. Mark Gruenwald, Eliot R. Brown and company really brought something wonderfully nerdtastic to the world of comics. And if imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, DC must have though so too. While I have a distinct preference of Marvel’s Handbooks over DC’s Who’s Who, one area where DCs offerings surpassed the Handbooks is the treatment of the art for the characters. Every character go his or her own logo and the 1-color background art provided a great way to put the character in context.

Shown above are all of Sienkiewicz’s contributions to the series and — appropriately enough — they are brimming with character.

(via fistfullofknives)

wonderful-strange:

daydreamfuel:
gnarlycovers:
Rampaging Hulk #9 (Marvel Comics - June 1978)
Illustrator: Earl Norem

wonderful-strange:

daydreamfuel:

gnarlycovers:

Rampaging Hulk #9 (Marvel Comics - June 1978)

Illustrator: Earl Norem

(via in-sequence)

DESIGN AND/OR COMICS.


Curated by Dylan Todd.

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